My Las Vegas

The Neon Museum and Binnie Wilkin present "My Las Vegas" - a series of short videos for elementary students using signs and the art of storytelling to bring Las Vegas history to life in a fun and creative way. Each story will introduce students to the Museum and some of the most significant signs in the collection. Educators, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for activities and story book recommendations.  This program is sponsored, in part, by the NV Energy Foundation.

"Chocolate Dandies: The Josephine Baker Story" 

Students in grades 4 - 6 will learn about the struggle for civil rights in Las Vegas through the story of Josephine Baker who performed at the Last Frontier in the 1950s.  They will also be introduced to the historic Moulin Rouge.

"Rosie Dances"

Suitable for grades k-1.  It is a  celebration of dance and the Stardust hotel sign. 

"Ma Liang and the Magic Paintbrush"

Suitable for grades 2-3

 A traditional Chinese folktale inspired by the magic lamp signs from the Aladdin now at the Museum.

 

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Art Projects

Enjoy making simple neon inspired ornaments based on signs in The Neon Museum collection.

The Stardust Star is the easiest, Coin Castle King is slightly more challenging, and the Ugly Duckling requires a little more scissor use. Each PDF includes instructions, materials needed and images.

If you don't have the exact materials handy, that's OK! We encourage you to get creative and experiment with what's available; different colors of paper and types of materials work fine and you could even cut up old magazines, coloring books, and newspapers for something unique.

This Stardust ornament is based on the stars from the 1968 Stardust hotel/casino sign. It was once the tallest sign in the world standing at 188 feet tall.

The king once ruled a kingdom of coins from a castle on Fremont Street. Debuting in the 1970s, the Coin Castle was a small casino with a large fiberglass king sitting atop the building. Today the Coin Castle King lives at The Neon Museum's Ne10 Studio.

The happy neon duck dates to c.1997 and advertised Ugly Duckling Car Sales on East Fremont Street. It was restored to working condition in 2019 and now glows as it greets visitors by peeking over the fence at the Museum.

Treasure Island skull craft

Treasure Island debuted on the Strip in 1993 during the “family-friendly” era of the 1990s. Several new resorts featured kid-friendly attractions and Treasure Island boasted a live-action pirate battle. The fiberglass skull was part of the hotel’s original double-sided sign. It is the largest sculptural sign element at The Neon Museum. For a fun and easy Treasure Island skull craft, click here.

Educator Resources

The Neon Museum’s resources for educators include unit and lesson plans, classroom activities, and pre- and post-visit field trip activities. Click on the link to access each lesson and activity.

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Vegas Illuminated

The "Vegas Illuminated" booklet was produced by The Neon Museum Curation and Education department.  It highlights some of the most asked about properties featured in the Neon Boneyard and is the Museum's answer to a common request from guests: image of signs in their original location. This project was made possible by a grant from Nevada Humanities.

 

Sign Survey

In 2002, The Neon Museum and UNLV Special Collections worked together to conduct a survey of neon signs on the Las Vegas Strip. The survey was designed to capture the artistic and historical significance of one of Las Vega’s best known art forms — neon. 

Click here to view the 2016-2018 Survey

 

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